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The Wright Perspective℠

Social Commentary from the C-Suite to Main Street℠

A Blog by Gary Wright II

11 face corruption charges in AL and GA judge busted with drugs and guns

Monday, October 4th, 2010

The South is finally cleaning up the acts of many of those in power. In Georgia, a senior federal judge was caught with drugs and guns. In Alabama, eleven people are facing federal charges for corruption.

I've been writing about the problem of corruption in Alabama for quite a while, so I wasn't surprised to see a report that eleven individuals are facing federal charges of corruption. Corruption is a problem at every level, including mayors, city councils, police officers, and senators. It's a problem that isn't limited to Alabama, it seems to be a widespread epidemic throughout our nation. I hope the investigations taking place in my state will continue, because it is just beginning to scratch the surface. I can't wait for election day so we the people have a chance to make some replacements of our own. Please register to vote and join me at the polls!


Senior US District Judge Jack Camp, Jr. has been charged with possession of cocaine, marijuana and roxycodone. He is also charged with possessing a firearm as an unlawful user of controlled substances, and with aiding and abetting the possession of drugs by a stripper who had a prior drug conviction.

Milton E. McGregor, 71, of Montgomery, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, six counts of federal program bribery and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

Ronald E. Gilley, 45, of Enterprise, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, six counts of federal program bribery, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud and four counts of money laundering.

Jarrod D. Massey, 39, of Montgomery, was charged with one count of conspiracy, five counts of federal program bribery and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

Thomas E. Coker, 70, of Lowndesboro, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

Robert B. Geddie Jr., 60, of Montgomery, was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud and one count of obstruction of justice.

Jarrell W. Walker Jr., 36, of Lanett, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

Harri Anne H. Smith, 48, of Slocomb, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, one count of extortion, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and four counts of money laundering.

Larry P. Means, 63, of Attalla, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, two counts of attempted extortion, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

James E. Preuitt, 75, of Talladega, Alabama, was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, one count of attempted extortion, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and one count of making a false statement.

Quinton T. Ross Jr., 41, of Montgomery, was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, two counts of attempted extortion, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

Joseph R. Crosby, 61, of Montgomery, was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

The conspiracy charge carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, the Justice Department said.

The federal program bribery charges carry a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Each count of extortion, honest services mail and wire fraud, money laundering and obstruction of justice carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The false statement charge carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Source: CNN.com


As always, remember they are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Best regards,

-- Gary Wright II

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